What is the Difference between UAT, Alpha Testing, or Beta Testing?

User Acceptance Testing (UAT).

  • As a (user),
  • I want (a feature).
  • So I can (reason for need/business benefit).

Why is UAT necessary?

When does UAT happen?

Who are the UAT participants?

  • Product Owner
  • Members of the Development Team who worked on User Story
  • The Product Owner can invite other stakeholders (Finance Marketing Support) to help with highly specialized features.

What is UAT?

Why is Alpha Testing necessary?

When does Alpha Testing happen?

  • Weeks of Alpha 1–2
  • 2–3 weeks of development

Who takes part in Alpha Testing?

  • Testers: These are usually internal members of the company, but not part of the Project Team.
  • Supporters: Development, Quality Assurance, and UI/UX Product Owners. These teams support users and analyze feedback in real-time and then document the results.

What is Alpha Testing?

  • Who tests?
  • Who supports?
  • They’ll be testing all features (test cases)
  • When will they be tested?
  • How to manage issues (reporting and logging, classification, prioritization).
  • Exit criteria (all cases tested, no “show-stopper” defects).
  • Defects can be logged and analyzed in real-time.
  • While some defects can be corrected immediately, others require deeper analysis and may result in the need to develop, integrate, and test more extensively.
  • Some of the defects will be fixed in the future; others could be a trigger for a “no-go” decision.

Beta Testing

Why is Beta Testing necessary?

When does Beta Testing happen?

  • Beta weeks 1–2
  • 2–3 weeks of development

Who is eligible to participate in Beta Testing?

  • Beta testers: These are usually actual customers (from the target markets) who have been given the software free of charge or as an incentive.
  • Supporters: Development, Quality Assurance, and UI/UX Product Owners. These teams support users and analyze feedback in real-time and then document the results.

What is Beta Testing?

  • Who tests?
  • Who supports?
  • They’ll be testing all features (test cases)
  • When will they be tested?
  • How to manage issues (reporting and logging, classification, prioritization).
  • Exit criteria (all cases tested, no “show-stopper” defects).
  • Defects can be logged and analyzed in real-time.
  • While some defects can be corrected immediately, others require deeper analysis and may result in the need to develop, integrate, and test more extensively.
  • Some of the defects will be fixed in the future; others could be a trigger for a “no-go” decision.

Conclusion

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I work as a Senior Testing Specialist at TestingXperts. I am a testing professional accustomed to working in a complex, project-based environment.

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Serena Gray

Serena Gray

I work as a Senior Testing Specialist at TestingXperts. I am a testing professional accustomed to working in a complex, project-based environment.

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